WEATHER »

Comments by henryjk

Page 1 of 4 | Next

Posted on November 20 at 9:11 p.m.

Let's see: loonpt links Lew Rockwell and Lew links to Alex Jones and Jones links to chem trails and the assertion that the Newton shootings never really happened... given the overwhelming evidence (such as the proof that Oswald would never have killed JFK since he had been a marine, and you know a marine would be patriotic and all) who could doubt that the world is ruled by secret cabals?

On Oswald Innocence Campaign Descends on Santa Barbara

Posted on August 17 at 9:44 p.m.

Pronouncements of positive change do not equate to actual positive change.
There is nothing new in the methodologies described here - strong teachers have always used these sorts of techniques and credential programs have always taught them. Used to be called "critical thinking" skills and "discovery learning."
As for the Common Core approach, twenty-plus years ago it was all the vogue except it was called "interdisciplinary curriculum."
It's all good, and when employed by strong instructors with students who value education it is effective and engaging.
But none of it is the magic elixir to revolutionize American education. The achievement gap between wealthy kids with highly educated parents and poor kids who don't speak English will not disappear. And the gap between test scores for schools in wealthy suburbs and those for inner city high crime areas will not go away. LIfe is not that simple... sometimes there are social and economic issues that transcend anything that teachers and schools can influence.
Some of the educator comments in the article are right on point ("If the only place students are reading and writing is in English then we are screwed.”) Still, they are truisms we have always known and are are not new concepts stemming from Common Core.
Other comments are fantastical nonsense: "those who are good at following directions, finishing work quickly, and finding right answers" might be frustrated by the new curriculum demands. Not so much; kids with those traits already have all the problem solving tools mastered and will continue to excel. But students who do not follow directions, don't finish work and do not find the right answers will continue to lag.

On An Idiot’s Guide to the Common Core

Posted on July 18 at 8:59 a.m.

GZ was a neighborhood watch guy with a loaded handgun. That seems like the definition of "looking for trouble."

On Stand By Your Dog

Posted on July 13 at 10:51 p.m.

No Genus... you posted at 9:09 and again at 9:17. Seems like about 8 minutes to me but then you are the attorney with the eye for detail.

On Beware of Dogs Bearing Gifts

Posted on July 13 at 10:41 a.m.

Genus says he is not going to engage with Welsh and 8 minutes later he starts spewing. Then Genus quickly pivots to another unrelated gossipy topic and finishes with profane language directed at the Poodle. This guy seems ready to implode...

On Beware of Dogs Bearing Gifts

Posted on June 8 at 6:08 p.m.

Couple of days of phony enthusiasm for the latest fad to magically educate every student to the same level regardless of the child's ablility, interest and life situation.

University educational researchers who live in an insulated fantasy world in combination with politicians who see the schools through whatever idealogical prism they prefer will never cease pushing new buzz words as if they are cure-all elixer for all classroom problems.

Two days now for mandatory Common Core training will have about as much impact as previous workshops devoted to earlier educational buzzwords like NCLB, Authentic Wholistic Evaluation, Standards-based Student Centered Learning, Portfolio Evaluation, etc., etc. have had: No impact at all.

How can the educational and political hierarchy embrace blanket programs for every school , every instructor, every student (Common Core being the latest) while simultaneously bubbling over with ecstatic praise for the haphazard world of Charter Schools where local parents and administrators are empowered to make up whatever curriculum they choose (some terrifically effectively and other crack-pot fiascos) ?

On A Failure To Communicate

Posted on January 3 at 8:42 p.m.

I was lucky to meet Mr. Higman and to speak to him regularly over the past few years.
Occasionally, when I would ask how he was doing, he would say,"Well, I'm barely clinging to life!"
But the wry smile and the sparkle in his eyes would belie those joking words. Far from clinging to it, Jim Higman radiated life and surely everyone who knew him felt the warmth of that radiant energy.
Mr. Higman's life was a century of adventure, intelligence, self-effacing humor, wisdom and grace. A delightful model of meaningful personal achievement, Jim's was a life very well lived.

On Obituary for James Edwin Higman

Posted on December 30 at 9:44 p.m.

What is odd is that Oblati won't acknowledge that reporters whose experience working at the News-Press for a total of more than 100 years were fired specifically because they took part in union organizational activities.
Of course they could have been let go at any previous time without cause, but they were not. They were fired immediately after taking part in legally protected unionization efforts specific. THAT cause was illegal and that was the basis for the NLRB rulings. Whatever the motives of the union advocates, their behaviors were within the law and their dismissal was a retaliation for exercising their legal rights.
That is the "odd" issue that JL and Oblati apparently cannot grasp.

On Wendy's Win

Posted on December 30 at 10:54 a.m.

JL turned this thread down the bogus, BS road that the appeals court adopted: The erroneous notion that the reporters were fired for trying to control the editorial content of the paper.
In reality they were fired for organizing a union and advocating a boycott. Both those activities are absolutely legal, according to federal law and the NLRB.
No matter what political motives you may impute to the newsroom staff the writers only had the power to write while editors and owners had the power to decide what got published. Individual writers could have been dismissed legitimately if the work product was deemed unsatisfactory but that was not at issue. The right to organize was the issue.

On Wendy's Win

Posted on October 27 at 9:44 p.m.

If anyone in town had those gigantic eucalypti towering over their homes or businesses and planted only ten feet from the wall of the structure they'd be fighting like crazy to have the city remove them. Eventually (could be pretty damn soon) one of those jumbos is going to split apart or drop a branch weighing several hundred pounds through the library roof or smack on some hapless patron walking out with a bunch of borrowed books.

On Five Eucalypti Declared 'Historic'

Page 1 of 4 | Next

The Dirty Knobs

The Dirty Knobs and The Coffis Brothers & The Mountain ... Read More