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Hound Hunting

Lobby to End Hunting Bears with Packs of Dogs


Friday, June 8, 2012
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A recent survey revealed that 83 percent of Californians oppose the practice of hounding — the inhumane and unsporting practices of using dogs to hunt down bear and bobcats. If you’re one of the 83 percent, then Lobby day on Tuesday, June 12 in Sacramento is a great time to make a difference for California’s bears, bobcats, and dogs.

The Humane Society of the United States, the ASPCA, and several California humane organizations are looking for animal advocates to help speak up in favor of Senate Bill 1221, which will prohibit the cruel and inhumane “hounding” of bears and bobcats with packs of dogs.

Last month, the California Senate voted 22 to 15 in favor of passing SB 1221 to end hounding. The legislation, SB 1221, authored by Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance) and coauthored by Senate president pro tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) now advances to the State Assembly with widespread public support. According to Lieu: “California has a long history of protecting its resources and protecting animal welfare. The practice of hound hunting often leads to them being injured, lost, or killed and their continued use runs counters to California’s reputation as a humane state. Hound hunting of bears is illegal in two-thirds of the United States; the time has come for California to abolish this inhumane and unnecessary practice.”

According to the Mount Shasta Herald, each year the bear season begins on the first day of deer hunting season, allowing hunters to use one dog per person until the end of the deer season. After deer season ends and the regular bear season begins, bear hunters are allowed to use packs of dogs to track and tree the animals.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), states that hound hunters use packs of dogs — sometimes 40 or more — to chase bears, bobcats, cougars, deer, or other animals until they try to climb a tree, or until the dogs catch them and tear them apart. The hunting dogs themselves are frequently injured or killed during the hunt. Hunters usually fit the dogs’ collars with GPS or radio telemetry devices so that they don’t even have to keep up with the chase — they can relax while the dogs do the work. With dogs after them, bears and cougars may not meekly scamper up a tree but may fight back. A single swipe from a bear can wound or kill a dog. The HSUS says that hunters often treat the dogs like hunting equipment rather than family members. When dogs don’t hunt well or get old, sick, injured, or pregnant, some hunters shoot them or abandon them to starve.

Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of the HSUS, says: “It is an archaic and unacceptable practice to allow dogs to harass and chase bears for miles and then to finish the animal off by shooting the tired and frightened animal out of a tree. This was a vote for mercy and decency.”

Sadly, even though 83 percent of Californians oppose hound hunting, the rest of the country may not. A web search on “hound hunting” resulted in over 7 million results, the majority of them pro-hound hunting, with YouTube videos showing hunts, websites dedicated to hound hunters, and hound hunting puppies for sale. Fourteen states — including Montana, Colorado, Washington, Pennsylvania, and Oregon — allow bear hunting but prohibit hounding. If you are opposed to hound hunting, Sacramento needs to hear your voice. For more information on attending Lobby day, visit action.humanesociety.org

Adoptable Pet of the Week

Jinx

Jinx is a 4-year-old neutered male kitty with an amazing personality. He is a cuddly kitty who is very smart and always figures out how to open up cupboards. He is such a love bug and would make a great addition to anyone’s family. Come in and meet Jinx today.

For more information, visit the Santa Barbara Humane Society at 5399 Overpass Road, or call (805) 964-4777. Shelter hours are Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. You can also visit sbhumanesociety.org.

Related Links

Lisa Acho Remorenko is executive director of Animal Adoption Solutions

Comments

Independent Discussion Guidelines

Only the hounds are hunting. But exercise is involved, for the humans, walking to the execution tree. It's like golf, only without acquired skill. If the dispatch was required to be done by spear, then those willing to risk it would be true sportsmen!

Generally speaking, hunters are necessary stakeholders for conservation. Witness Ducks Unlimited. But land hunters will only push for more roads on public lands, and that diminishes wildness.

Why not just raise tag fees for hound hunters?

Adonis_Tate (anonymous profile)
June 8, 2012 at 2:51 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Obviously written by a (greenie) the facts listed in this article are for the most part false. Hunting has and will always play a intrical role in the management of animals. I have found that people in general find some methods of hunting barbaric. Untill it is one of their children that is harmed or killed by a wild animal from lack of management. It is then and only then that people see or understand the role that hunting plays. After that it has been my experience they cease carring about how and only want the animal in question dead. So sometimes dogs or bears or people get hurt while hunting, how many people get killed going to work. Is it the same maybe mabe not but we need to work and we need to manage animals.

iinvno1 (anonymous profile)
June 8, 2012 at 5:42 p.m. (Suggest removal)

This article is complete bologna. I was lmao at the comment that hunters treat their dogs like equipment. The HSUS is full of mud. Most all hunters are as passionate about their beloved animals as they are their way of life. If you disagree with hunting just say " I think its wrong" as we all have opinions. Don't hide behind lies and pitiful propaganda. It makes you look transparently stupid. Hunters: don't get baited by the untruths of a minority of the deluded. Just hunt and enjoy life and nature's bounty ...including bears & bobcats. And vote against sb1221!

truth4sure (anonymous profile)
June 8, 2012 at 6:36 p.m. (Suggest removal)

I disagree with hunting bears with packs of dogs, it's inhumane and not sporting at all. I think it's wrong: pass SB 1221!

DrDan (anonymous profile)
June 8, 2012 at 7:40 p.m. (Suggest removal)

That is your right Doc but am curious??? What is inhumane about it????. Ok dogs and humans have been "working" hand in hand for a very long time. Humans did not teach dogs to chase bears it is NATURAL. If you disagree with running bears with dogs you must also disagree with wolves being reintroduced in places they don't belong. Because it must be inhumane for the wolve to chase catch and kill helpless deer, elk, sheep, moose, goats and cattle. Or is that natural? Hmm, not sure how to answer that? You can't have your cake and eat it too. Ever watched a wolve catch one of the above mentioned animals? I have been around wildlife my entire life and I will tell you it makes even my stomach turn. At least when a hunter's dogs catch and tree a bear, it is disbatched HUMANELY. Not so much with the wolve.

iinvno1 (anonymous profile)
June 8, 2012 at 9:58 p.m. (Suggest removal)

"We are going to use the ballot box and the democratic process to stop all hunting in the United States ... We will take it species by species until all hunting is stopped in California. Then we will take it state by state. "Wayne Pacelle, (HSUS)

can there be any question what the real motives are of the HSUS? If you have a bird dog , a spaniel, a labrador and you hunt birds or ducks please read the above.. it means YOU..

dougw (anonymous profile)
June 10, 2012 at 7:07 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Does HS$S donate to the local shelters?
An organization can co-opt a good cause, while having other sinister agendas. Look deeper into the mandatory spay/neuter laws and the graft/conflict of interest the PETA/HS$S veterinarians benefit from as the result of these laws. Consider too how many people are forced to surrender their pets...I mean "Animal Companions" to the shelter if they can't afford to shill out money to these vets because of these laws.

There's a lot more going on than people realize.

billclausen (anonymous profile)
June 10, 2012 at 3:38 p.m. (Suggest removal)

I side with billclauson, on this one. I don't like hunting but only from experience comes knowledge, I've seen good hunters who are humane with the taking-down of animals, who protect the envirornment, who care for their hunting pets, who contribute their paychecks to improve the sport and health of the ecology of their hunting environment, use brass-catchers, hike-out their trash, use lead-free rounds but I also have seen the bad and there are many more than the good ones in that realm. As for hunting big game, I have been instructed NEVER let your dog loose when tracking either an animal or a human unless you can visually see the Hunting dog, Police Dogs are the exception to that rule due to that their handlers are instructed to give the Perp a chance to give up and that their dogs are considered Police Officers in the eyes of the law.

dou4now (anonymous profile)
June 11, 2012 at 11:40 a.m. (Suggest removal)

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), states that hound hunters use packs of dogs — sometimes 40 or more — to chase bears, bobcats, cougars, deer, or other animals until they try to climb a tree, or until the dogs catch them and tear them apart. The hunting dogs themselves are frequently injured or killed during the hunt. Hunters usually fit the dogs’ collars with GPS or radio telemetry devices so that they don’t even have to keep up with the chase — they can relax while the dogs do the work. With dogs after them, bears and cougars may not meekly scamper up a tree but may fight back. A single swipe from a bear can wound or kill a dog. The HSUS says that hunters often treat the dogs like hunting equipment rather than family members. When dogs don’t hunt well or get old, sick, injured, or pregnant, some hunters shoot them or abandon them to starve.

look at this paragraph "sometimes" as many as 40 or more.. SOMETIMES uh not in CA one hunter is allowed ONE DOG

"frequently injured.". really?how many times is "frequently? "usually fit with collars".. Really? how many times is "usually" Hunters "often" treat their dogs.. really? how often is "often"? "some hunters shoot " etc.. REALLY? how many is "some"? when you read articles like this use your brain.. this is generalization with absolutely NO statistical back up.. ask you assembly person to oppose this bill

dougw (anonymous profile)
June 11, 2012 at 12:43 p.m. (Suggest removal)

The statements in this article are mostly false. How dare you publish such smut about something you don't understand and will never. It is fine if you have grown up in the california suburbs and never been exposed to our way of life but how dare you weigh in on a topic that you have no real knowledge of. If you actually look at the facts hunters are some of the biggest wildlife activists around. We care more about the environment than the city dwellers that destroy it. I can not believe the nerve on people to contest american tradition and heritage. I bet your great grandparents would be ashamed to have you bare their name. If you don't understand things that is fine but don't weigh in on issues that you have no business in. Your oppinions are what they are and I know nothing I say will change that. But they are idiotic and are a result of your poor education on the topic. This is basic species conservation, which you obviously don't understand. Man is in the food chain whether you like it or not. We always have been a functioning part of this ecosystem. Take away the biggest preditor of the food chain and you will not like the result. Ps my abused dog is sleeping in bed beside me with his 2 dollar bone. Why don't you ask him how much he hates hunting. But oh ya he should have been dead 5 years ago according to your article.

thomasg (anonymous profile)
October 25, 2012 at 12:06 a.m. (Suggest removal)

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